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MidMichigan Health: Fall prevention strategies
Source:
Midland Daily News

Unfortunately, falls are all too common, especially among adults over the age of 65. About one in four adults over the age of 65 experiences a fall, and approximately 95 percent of all hip fractures are related to falls.

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What does it feel like to have carpal tunnel syndrome?
Source:
healthline

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a condition that affects the hand, wrist, and arm. It happens when the median nerve gets compressed, or squeezed, at the wrist. The median nerve is a large nerve running from the palm to the upper arm.

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Swollen feet and ankles: Treatments to try
Source:
healthessentials

Have you ever looked down at your ankles and feet and barely recognized them as your own because of swelling? It happens, whether it’s from long days on your feet, hours of travel, surgery or pregnancy.

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Everyday tips for chronic back pain
Source:
WebMD

Your back pain could get better, and soon. There are many treatments that could help, from physical therapy to small but strategic changes in your daily routine. Even your breathing might make a difference!

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Dead arm syndrome: Symptoms, causes, and treatment
Source:
Healthline

Dead arm syndrome is a condition that affects the shoulder. It’s caused by repeated movements, which place stress on the joint.

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What is water on the knee?
Source:
Medical News Today

Knee effusion, sometimes called water on the knee, occurs when excess fluid accumulates in or around the knee joint. Common causes include arthritis and injury to the ligaments or meniscus, which is cartilage in the knee.

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Why strengthening your hip flexors is important, according to new research
Source:
Runner's World

When it comes to strengthening your lower-body muscles that power your running, most runners focus on quads and hamstrings—but are you showing your hip flexors enough love? A recent study in the Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics suggests that ignoring them could lead to mobility issues as you age.

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The Top 14 Foods and Supplements for Sports Injuries
Source:
healthline

When it comes to sports and athletics, injuries are an unfortunate part of the game. Fortunately, certain foods and supplements may help reduce the amount of time your body needs to recover from a sports injury.

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5 Signs of a Thumb Sprain
Source:
Handcare

A sprained thumb is an injury to a ligament, which is a soft tissue that connects bones to each other at the joints to keep it stable, as opposed to a thumb fracture (break) which is an injury to the bone. The ulnar collateral ligament is the most injured ligament in the thumb. This particular ligament connects the thumb to the hand on the side closest to your index finger.

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What Surgery Works Best for Advanced Ankle Arthritis?
Source:
HealthDay

For patients with severe ankle arthritis, total ankle replacement provides better function over the long haul than the traditional surgical treatment, a new study finds.

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How to Tell if You Have Arthritis in Your Neck
Source:
msn

No matter where it occurs in the body, arthritis can be a real pain. One type, which goes by the name cervical spondylosis, can leave you with a stiff neck or major aches.

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Don’t let shoulder pain sideline your summer
Source:
Cleveland Jewish News

Shoulders are among the most frequently injured joints in the body, with the main culprit stemming from the rotator cuff, the part of the shoulder that allows you to lift and rotate your arms. Over 3 million Americans each year are affected by rotator cuff problems.

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Knee Pain and Function: Nonoperative Approaches to Managing Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome
Source:
Practical Pain Management

Physical rehabilitation and osteopathic manipulative techniques can treat different aspects of “runner’s knee,” to alleviate tight muscles and tender points within the joint or muscle and increase range of motion.

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Yoga Moves to Improve Hip Health
Source:
AARP

Protect yourself from pain and disability with simple exercises you can do at home

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Why physical activity matters now more than ever
Source:
Medical Xpress

Exercise not only helps people with long-term conditions better manage their health but also boosts the immune system. So how can we support more people to be physically active?

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ACR: Osteoporosis underdiagnosed, undertreated in older men
Source:
HealthDay

In the older male population, there is a high level of underdiagnosis and undertreatment of osteoporosis, according to a study presented at ACR Convergence, the annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology, held virtually from Nov. 5 to 9.

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Autologous chondrocyte implantation in the knee: M-ACI has comparable benefit to therapy alternative
Source:
Medical Xpress

Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) has been used in adults with deep cartilage defects for over 30 years and has been further developed and modified over time. For the most recent procedure, matrix-induced ACI (M-ACI), favorable effects have been shown suggesting that the benefits are at least comparable to those of therapy alternatives.

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Tips for Treating Your Bicep Pain at Home
Source:
healthessentials

The bicep muscle is one of the most important muscles for your upper body strength. An injury to this hardworking muscle can make day-to-day tasks difficult.

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Topical steroids reduce swallowing difficulties following ACDF surgery
Source:
Spinal News International

A study presented as part of the AAOS 2020 Virtual Education Experience has found that topical steroids administered during anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) surgery help reduce swallowing difficulties following the procedure. The findings were presented by lead investigator Todd Albert, surgeon-in-chief emeritus at the Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, USA.

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Ankle injuries: when is it time to call the doctor?
Source:
healthessentials

Your child comes home from a game, practice or the playground and is limping and complaining about ankle pain. Could something be sprained, strained or —even worse — broken?

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Arthroscopic osteocapsular arthroplasty yielded good outcomes, survivorship
Source:
Healio

Arthroscopic osteocapsular arthroplasty for elbow contracture led to an increase in motion, good to excellent outcomes and good long-term survivorship, according to results from the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting.

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How to treat a bruised knee
Source:
Medical News Today

Most bruises, also known as contusions, are mild and heal on their own. However, more severe contusions can damage muscle tissue or bone, which may take longer to heal.

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Transient Osteoporosis of the Hip Overview
Source:
Verywell Health

Transient osteoporosis of the hip is a condition that occurs for unknown reasons. The condition is characterized by a spontaneous onset of hip pain associated with x-ray signs of osteoporosis and MRI evidence of bone inflammation.

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What to know about kneecap dislocation
Source:
Medical News Today

A kneecap becomes dislocated when the patella bone, which sits at the front of the knee, comes out of position. In the process, the connective tissues that hold the bone in place may stretch and tear.

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How Is a Rotator Cuff Tear Diagnosed?
Source:
healthline

A doctor or physiotherapist can use one of more than 25 functional tests during a physical exam to diagnosis a torn rotator cuff. Some of these tests directly indicate a rotator cuff injury and others rule out similar injuries like nerve impingement or torn labrum.

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How to Keep Your Spine Happy While Working – or Learning – at Home
Source:
US News

Whether you're the parent of a young student who is learning remotely this fall or a student yourself – or you're working from home – understanding ways to minimize your spine injury risk is essential.

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How to Know if You Have a Sprained Wrist
Source:
Handcare

The wrist is often injured, and there are many different types of injuries you could sustain including a sprained wrist, wrist fracture, ligament tear, etc. Most often, a sprained wrist takes place because of a fall or sudden twisting motion of the wrist.

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Is There Such a Thing as ‘Good Pain’ and When Should You Listen to Your Body?
Source:
healthessentials

Weight-bearing and cardiovascular activities stress the body. As a result of that stress, we enhance our strength and endurance. By pushing our physical boundaries, we optimize our athletic performance. But this process is almost always at the cost of feeling some level of pain.

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When Can I Return to Play After an Orthopedic Sports Injury?
Source:
Health US News

As an orthopedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine, the timing of when a player can "return to sport" is one of the most frequently asked questions of me – from the patients themselves, their parents (if they're minors) and from the media, especially if I'm being interviewed about a professional athlete.

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Lifelong physical activity increases bone density in men
Source:
Medical Xpress

Men have many reasons to add high-impact and resistance training to their exercise regimens; these reasons include building muscle and shedding fat. Now a University of Missouri researcher has determined another significant benefit to these activities: building bone mass.

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Mayo Clinic Q and A: Hip dysplasia — when is surgery required?
Source:
News Network

Hip dysplasia is a condition in which the top portion of the thigh bone doesn't fit properly in the socket portion of the hip joint - either because it is out of place or it is not the correct shape. In many cases, this condition is present at birth. Some people may not be diagnosed during childhood, however, and only when symptoms appear later is the problem identified. Although some adults with hip dysplasia need surgery to correct the problem, total hip replacement isn’t always necessary.

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Newer UKR prosthesis for patients with osteoarthritis achieved satisfactory results
Source:
Healio

Patients who received a newer prosthesis similar to the Miller-Galante knee design showed significantly better Knee Society function scores than patients who had a long-used prosthesis to which it was compared. However, the two implants performed about the same at short-term follow-up, according to a presenter.

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Treatment of Locked Posterior Shoulder Dislocation With Bone Defect
Source:
Healio

Locked posterior shoulder dislocation is an uncommon condition and is associated with a reverse Hill-Sachs lesion in 50% of cases. The condition is likely to occur in cases of violent trauma, seizures, or electric shock. Unrecognized dislocation with humeral head fracture affects joint function and humeral head vascularity and may lead to chronic instability, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis.

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Study on use of umbilical cord vs. biocellulose film for antenatal spina bifida repair
Source:
Medical Xpress

In a study to be presented on Feb. 5 in an oral plenary session, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in Atlanta, researchers will present findings from a study titled, Cryopreserved Human Umbilical Cord (HUC) vs. Biocellulose Film (BCF) for Antenatal Spina Bifida Repair.

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ORIF, new casting method showed similar results for unstable ankle fractures
Source:
Healio

Treatment of overtly unstable malleolar fractures with close contact casting showed outcomes equivalent to those of open reduction and internal fixation among elderly patients and were associated with a cost reduction in results of a multicenter study presented at the Orthopaedic Trauma Association Annual Meeting, here.

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Rates of Complications and Secondary Surgeries After In Situ Cubital Tunnel Release Compared With Ulnar Nerve Transposition: A Retrospective Review.
Source:
Ncbi

A retrospective cohort study was performed by query of hospital billing records for all patients who underwent cubital tunnel surgery from August 2008 to July 2013, yielding 421 patients. Exclusion criteria were acute trauma, revision surgery, neoplasm, age younger than 18 years, incomplete records, and postoperative follow-up less than 3 months. Of the remaining 234 patients, 147 patients underwent 157 in situ cubital tunnel releases and 87 patients underwent 90 ulnar nerve transpositions.

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Care of Shoulder Pain in the Overhead Athlete.
Source:
Ncbi

Shoulder complaints are common in the overhead athlete. Understanding the biomechanics of throwing and swimming requires understanding the importance of maintaining the glenohumeral relationship of the shoulder. Capsular laxity, humeral retrotorsion, glenoid retroversion, glenohumeral internal rotation deficit, and scapular dyskinesis can all contribute to shoulder dysfunction and pain.

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Patient-reported results, knee stability improved after all-inside double-bundle ACL reconstruction
Source:
Healio

Investigators found significant improvements from preoperative measures at 24.8-month follow-up for both mean side-to-side differences and Lysholm scores in patients who underwent double-bundle ACL reconstruction using a special drill pin guide and reamer, along with a laser-guided device to facilitate a transtibial approach.

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Study supports efficacy of closed reduction, percutaneous fixation of crescent-fracture dislocations
Source:
Healio

Recently published data highlight the safety and efficacy of closed reduction and percutaneous screw fixation for the treatment of crescent fracture-dislocation of the sacroiliac joint and indicate satisfactory function and radiographic outcomes with the procedure.

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Imaging identifies cartilage regeneration in long-distance runners
Source:
RSNA

Using a mobile MRI truck, researchers followed runners for 4,500 kilometers through Europe to study the physical limits and adaptation of athletes over a 64-day period, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

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Innovative tissue engineering strategies to repair spinal disc herniation
Source:
EurekAlert!

New therapeutic approaches to repair herniated discs in the lumbar spine using novel tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies have shown promising outcomes in preclinical studies and target the underlying problem of disc injury or instability, unlike current nonsurgical and surgical treatments.

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Revision Rate and Risk Factors After Lower Extremity Amputation in Diabetic or Dysvascular Patients
Source:
PubMed

This article reports the revision rate and possible risk factors for lower extremity amputations in patients with diabetes mellitus or peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Data were collected from 421 patients with diabetes mellitus or PAD who underwent amputations of the lower extremity at the authors’ institution from 2002 to 2012.

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Anatomic Variation in Volar Tilt of the Scaphoid and Lunate Facet of the Distal Radius
Source:
PubMed

The aim of distal radial fracture treatment is to achieve optimal function through the restoration of normal anatomy, including volar tilt. The accuracy of assessing volar tilt on standard lateral radiographs compared with anatomic tilt lateral (ATL) radiographs is uncertain.

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Martial arts can be hazardous to kids
Source:
Medical Xpress

(HealthDay)—Perhaps there's a black belt in your child's future. But for safety's sake, kids should only engage in noncontact forms of martial arts, a new American Academy of Pediatrics report says.

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